Spring Driving Tips Every Professional Truck Driver Should Know

Any professional truck driver will tell you that you need a different set of skills for spring truck driving than you do for winter driving. But how many truck drivers actually know what these tips are? Not being able to tell the difference between a winter road and a spring road can be dangerous to not just the truck driver but to all those on the road around them.

Well, springs almost here. Are you ready for these essential spring truck driving tips? Let’s get started!

Spring Into Safe Driving

When was the last time you had seen a sign telling you to watch for ice on the side of the road while driving in a sunny location in Southern California. Situations like this should make every professional truck driver consider the different truck driving extremes presented by different seasons.

As winter snow melts, be sure to watch for spray kicked up by other road vehicles traveling through the slush. If there is no spray being kicked up and the road appears to be wet, it probably means the roads are icy. Be sure to check you mirrors and antenna as well. When temperatures drop below 35 degrees dampness can freeze if the surface of the road is colder than that.

It only takes a small amount of ice to cause you to lose control of your truck, which could change the trajectory of your entire day. You might also take caution when there are heavy winds. Understandably, lighter trailers are at a higher risk of blowing over, but heavy trucking trailers are at risk as well. Don’t leave anything for granted when it comes to the safety of your vehicle.

Where trucks may not exactly blow over, high winds can result in the truck going off to the side of road or for the truck to lose traction when roads are slick, which can lead to a crash.

Warm Weather Doesn’t Automatically Mean Safe Driving

When the weather begins to warm, wild animals start moving closer to highways. The ground closest to the pavement warms faster than the ground away from pavement, causing vegetation to grow faster in these areas. Wild animals set out toward vegetation when this happens and can make roads more dangerous for both truck drivers and those operating passenger vehicles.

Female deer can give birth as early as February and continue to fawn through July. When deer are pregnant, they need more vegetation and move at a slower pace. If one suddenly appears in front of you, it will be harder for them to move out of the way.

Wild animals are likely to be livelier near the highway around dusk and dawn. There are still plenty of wild animals out during the day and in complete darkness, so be alert.

If an animal jumps in front of your truck while driving down the highway, don’t panic, grip your steering wheel tightly and slow down without slamming on your breaks. This will keep your truck on a forward path making it safer for yourself and others around you. Deviating from the forward path has caused many trucking deaths and even more accidents involving other vehicles around the truck.

Keep an Eye on Four-Legged Friends

Remember deer are much smaller than your truck and hitting one may damage it, but it is much safer than swerving and possibly tipping over your truck and load. Your job will most likely be in tact for hitting a large animal but flipping the truck and ruining the goods in the trailer may cause a different outcome for your safety and the safety of your job.

The beginning of spring is the best time to check your truck’s air conditioning mechanism to ensure it is functioning at full capacity. It is getting warmer out and you’ll need it soon.

Always pay close attention to your truck tires’ condition to ensure they are in good shape for the warmer weather ahead. Examine your tires for deterioration and any indication of tire rot.

Keep these principles in mind and you will be  safe operator no matter the season!